To view items in the collection, you must enable JavaScript in your Internet browser. You can find instructions at enable-javascript.com.

Selector

Choose an Action:

Browse:

 

 

Search terms must be 4 characters or longer. Words like the, USA, and to are ignored.
Common words like this, that, and other are ignored as search terms.
Use an asterisk (*) as a wildcard. For example navigator* matches both navigator and navigators.
Use quotation marks (") to match phrases: "training school" matches training school but not training at school.

NoteUse Browse the Collection to better find items by Air Field or Class/Unit Number.

Viewing 55 items for Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

(Site Details)

Page 1 of 3 View next Page  View final Page

Hide

Advanced Flight Training; Basic Flight Training

History of the Goodfellow Field


Lt John J. Goodfellow, Jr.

Appropriately, Goodfellow Field received its name from one of the heroes of World War I--Lieutenant John J. Goodfellow, Jr., son of John J. Goodfellow, San Angelo, Texas. Lieutenant Goodfellow, who was a member of the famed 24th Aero Squadron which was formed May 1, 1917, at Kelly Field, Texas, was shot down in action with enemy aircraft over the St. Michiel Salient sector of France the afternoon of September 17, 1918.

Originally, however, the field was known simply as the San Angelo Air Corps Basic Flying School. The lease for the ground, originally consisting of one section of land (640 acres), was arranged in August, 1940. On September 5 ground was broken and the building of the field began.

The plans then called for 75 buildings, but which have been increased until they now total more than 200--with about 75 on the flight line itself.

The San Angelo Air Corps Basic Flying School was officially opened on January 15, 1941, with the first class of 111 aviation cadets arriving on February 11, 1941.

Out of that original class of young fliers, Class 41-E, have emerged a number who have become aerial heroes on almost every battle front of the world. Captain Andrew J. Reynolds, one of the leading aces in the Southwest Pacific; Lieutenants Thomas K. Taylor and James A. Isbell, who were with General Doolittle during the invasion of North Africa, both of whom received Air Medals for action in that particular phase of fighting, and Lieutenant William G. Farrow, who also flew with General Doolittle against Tokyo, was shot down and is believed to have been executed.

On February 20, the post theatre was opened, and officials began looking for sites for auxiliary landing fields. These auxiliary landing fields, which today total six, were pioneered by Goodfellow Field. Used for both night and day flying, they serve to relieve traffic congestion at the home field and at the same time enable the personnel to train more pilots with greater safety.

On April 26, the new flying field graduated its first class of aviation cadets, and on August 11, 1941, the first draftees arrived from Camp Lee, Virginia.

The field began to grow, aviation cadet classes began to become larger, the enlisted personnel expanded and so did the field in general. A bowling alley was added, a combined post exchange and cafe was built. Since then the cafe has been moved from near Headquarters to near the flight line, with the new place about three times the original size and the post exchange similarly expanded.

On May 24, 1941, San Angelo Air Corps Basic Flying School became officially known as Goodfellow Field, in honor of Lieutenant Goodfellow. And on July 4, under a roaring canopy of training planes, Goodfellow Field was officially dedicated.

During this time, from December 27, 1940, when Colonel A. M. Guidera, the first Commanding Officer, retired because of poor health, Colonel G. M. Palmer was Commanding Officer. he remained at this post until June 1, 1942, when he was relieved by Colonel Henry R. Baxter and assumed command of the new bombardier school southwest of San Angelo. Colonel Baxter was succeeded by Colonel Linus D. Grederick on November 1, 1942.

During the time that Colonel Frederick was in command, several new buildings were planned for Goodfellow Field. A new gymnasium, with an overall length of 160 feet and a seating capacity of approximately 1,200, and two new hangars on the flight line, where among those included in the expansion of the field. A new post operations building also was built in the spring of 1943.

On April 1, Colonel Glenn L. Davasher, who formerly had been Chief, Technical Training Division, Directorate of Individual Training, at headquarters of the Army Air Forces in Washington, D. C., assumed command of Goodfellow Field.

Under his command, with Lieutenant Colonel (now Colonel) Harold A. Gunn as Director of Training, the Manning Table was put into effect. The Manning Table was a pattern of training and operations which utilized every available man to the utmost, thus eliminating excessive manpower and relieving them for other duties.

During this time Goodfellow Field was visited by a number of dignitaries and famous fliers, including Colonel Francisco C. Lopez, Inspector General and second in command of the Portuguese Army Air Forces, on April 30, and Major General Ping-Hung Whang, air attache of the Chinese Embassy, on May 24.

During the summer U. S. Marine Corps Major Joe Foss, America's greatest ace, visited the field briefly. Also Major john W. Mitchell and Captain Thomas Lanphier, P-38 pilots of the AAF from the Southwest Pacific, with eight and seven, respectively, Japanese Zeros to their credit, and Jimmie Mattern, famous Lockheed test pilot, visited Goodfellow Field.

On June 1, 1943, the post received its first contingent of WAAC's, which later became the Women's Army Corps. About 25 members were in the first group, which has been steadily growing since.

In June, 1943, Goodfellow Field inaugurated the first Aerial Intramurals in the Central Flying Training Command, and possibly the first in the Army Air Forces. A flying contest of inter-squadron rivalry, the Aerial Intramurals proved so successful that they now are held at the close of training for each graduating class. They consist of hurdle stage landings, precision landings, acrobatics, blind take-off and formation flying.

Goodfellow Field ceased to be called "Army Air Forces Basic Flying School" on August 10, 1943, when it was officially changed to "Army Air Forces Pilot School (Basic)."

During these two and a half years since Goodfellow Field came into existence upon the face of a rolling prairie land that once nurtured the whiteface and rambouillet [cattle and sheep], uncounted numbers of precision-trained airmen have gone from its flight lines to foreign skies to mark up heroic records in the annals of World War II and the Goodfellow Field "Hangar of Fame."

There is Lieutenant Charles J. Paine, of Class 41-I, whose fame spread around the world as the pilot of the Flying Fortress, "Phyllis," that was practically demolished in the skies over France by 4- of Germany's best fighters, yet was landed safely in England by Lieutenant Paine.

Captain James A. Watkins, Class 41-G, has 11 Jap planes to his credit. Captain John F. Buie, Class 41-F, holds the D. F. C. for bravery in action during 22 tactical missions. Captain John F. Tate, Class 41-I, has been awarded the D. F. C., Air Medal and nine Oak Leaf Clusters.


Capt Bryan M. Lloyd
42-F


Lt William H. Campbell
42-D


Lt Ralph G. Stevens
42-D


Capt Clinton W. Breeding
42-B


Lt William A. Peterson
42-D

Names of other graduates in the Goodfellow Field "Hangar of Fame" are legion. Among them are Captain Bryan M. Lloyd, 42-F, Air Medal, five Oak Leaf Clusters, recommended for D. F. C. and citation; Lieutenant William R. Ross, 41-E, Air Medal; Captain John F. Zinn, 41-F, Air Medal, Oak Leaf Cluster; Lieutenant William H. Campbell, 42-D, D. F. C.; Lieutenant Ralph G. Stevens, 42-D, Air Medal; Lieutenant Joseph M. Wunderl, 41-I, Air Medal; Captain Clinton W. Breeding, 42-B, Air Medal, Oak Leaf Cluster; Lieutenant William A. Peterson, 42-D, D. F. C.

Among the enlisted men at Goodfellow Field were the two Mathis brothers, Mark and Jack, who later were commissioned as Lieutenants after graduating from bombardier training. Lieutenant Jack Mathis was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor posthumously. Lieutenant Mark took his brother's place in the nose of the bomber, and was reported missing a few weeks later.

But the list is growing endless. Every day, every week, every long, toiling month, sees more and more Goodfellow Field men over France, Germany, across the vastness of the South and Southwest Pacific. And as the war progresses steadily in favor of the Allies, they are punching hard with the determinations that American and world liberty will be preserved.

Source: Transcribed from Army Air Forces Collection, "Goodfellow Field: Class 43-K and 44-A, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas" (item 000496), AAF Collection, http://AAFCollection.info/items/list.php?item=000496 (accessed 23 February 2014), 1943, page 34.

Source: Cadet photographs from respective class books in the AAF Collection.

Hide

Top of PageView next PageView previous Page

Result NumberImageLocationsTitleCC EE FF GG

1

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 41-H, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 41-H at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

2

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 41-I, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 41-I at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

3

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-A, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 42-A at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

4

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-B, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 42-B at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

5

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-C, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 42-C at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

6

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-D, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 42-D at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

7

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-E, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 42-E at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

8

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-F, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 42-F at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

9

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-G, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU). Class book for pilot class 42-G at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

10

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-H, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 42-H at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling And Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

11

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-I, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 42-I at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

12

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 42-J, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 42-J at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

13

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-A, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 43-A at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

14

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-B, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 43-B at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

15

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-C, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU). Class book for pilot class 43-C at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

16

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-D, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU). Class book for pilot class 43-D at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

17

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-F, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU). Class book for pilot class 43-F at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

18

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-G, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for basic pilot class 43-G at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

19

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-H, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Class book for pilot class 43-H at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas. Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU).

20

Goodfellow Field; San Angelo, Texas, USA

CAVU Click for Details
Class 43-I, Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas

Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited (CAVU). Class book for pilot class 43-I at Goodfellow Field, San Angelo, Texas.

Display items per page

Top of Page
Page 1 of 3 View next Page  View final Page

New: Items added or revised in the last 30 days.

Series

Series: Different items with the same title.

Copies

Copies: Identical items, with different attributes.

Collection

Collection: A group of related items.

Quick Link: http://aafcollection.info/items/list.php?site=GOODFELLOW

Curator: Mike Voisin

Creative Commons License

All items in the Army Air Forces Collection are licensed by Mike Voisin under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Revised: October 17, 2015
Database and Website Copyright © 2006-2015 Mike Voisin. All rights reserved.
Collection Items Copyright © 2006-2015 Mike Voisin. Some rights reserved.